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La solución de posibles problemas de unidad de disco duro al jugar en vivo (con Live)
DJ Wolfie on Sat, April 30th | 5 comments
I'm at a gig, djing with Ableton Live. Half way through my set, I suddenly can't cue tracks. I push the button on my Native Instruments Audio Kontrol 1, nothing. Oh boy. Good thing I know my clips wel

Estoy en un concierto, pinchar con Ableton Live . A mitad de mi juego, de repente no puede pistas de señal. Pulso el botón de mi Native Instruments Audio Kontrol 1, nada. Oh, muchacho. Lo bueno es que conozco mis clips también.

I finish the gig, and I start the long process of uncovering all the things I've done wrong to have this situation occur. My first call of course is to my friend Jon, Author of "Ableton Live 8 Power!". First thing he asks is if I'm using an internal drive, or an external drive. I am in fact using the internal laptop drive for all my music files. I was smart enough to have installed a 7200 rpm drive- many drives are 5400, and considered too slow for music work.

However, what I did was use up 495 gigs out of the available 500 gigs. This resulted in Ableton simply not having enough disc cache available to run properly. With 95% of my drive full, the Drive head has to travel all over the place as well, which slows it down.

Así que el primer consejo, deje de toneladas, y me refiero a un montón de espacio de disco duro libre. 10% como mínimo.

Jon dice que muchas personas van incluso más allá, y utilizar un disco FireWire 800 para las muestras de música, y dejar la unidad interna de funcionamiento del sistema. La teoría aquí es que la unidad de la música tiene una cabeza de lectura dedicado a la lectura de muestras de música, y nada más. Una vez más, asegúrese de que la unidad externa es de 7200 rpm.

El sistema y el programa se han cabeza de lectura del disco duro interno que se dedica sólo a realizar la operación del sistema y las funciones de operación del programa.

Dos barras de reproducción son mejores que la cabeza juega un.

¿Por qué Firewire 800?

¿Tienes alguna Ableton, Logic, el hardware o los problemas de software? No cuelgue alrededor de visitar los foros de macProVideo ayuda y consejo!

Comments (5)

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  • Dekuruy
    Thanks, Dj Wolfie for this info. Your noting the advantages of firewire 800 vs. 400 reminded me of something I was wondering about. Can I have my external hard drive before my audio interface? As of now, I've been connecting my interface (MOTU 8pre) to my Mac first, and then connecting my hard drive to the interface. This forces me to use firewire 400 for the hard drive, because my interface is firewire 400 only. It works ok like that, but I've not really put it to the test - which is that I plan on recording sixteen audio channels simultaneously onto the external drive. Will it make a difference if I connect the hard drive to my Mac's firewire 800 port, and then connect the 8pre to the hard drive (that last connection being firewire 400)?
    • 8 years ago
    • By: Dekuruy
    Reply
  • Rounik Admin
    Hey Adam, Some interfaces behave differently in this regard. I've tried both connection methods in the past - though never relying on recording more than 3 audio tracks simultaneously. Both worked well. I'd actually add that USB 2.0 and Firewire 400 are vastly different. The transfer rate numbers may look similar, but in real-world tests Firewire 400 streaming data at about 50MB per second will perform absolutely fine for all but the most demanding of rigs. Also take into account that USB 2.0 can provide fast data transfer in bursts - great for copying data, etc. But for audio and video applications Firewire 400/800 is better because it has a higher 'constant streaming transfer rate' which provides better peformance when streaming (e.g.recording) audio in real-time. So, Firewire 800 is preferable of course(!) - but Firewire 400 will suit the needs of most people and then on top of that the new Thunderbolt technology looks set to blow all the above and USB 3.0 out of the water! In the theory, say good bye to multiple ports on your Mac - instead have a "Thunderbolt hub" with different connections for Firewire, USB2, PCI, Display port, etc devices. :)
    • 8 years ago
    • By: Rounik Admin
    Reply
  • Dekuruy
    Thanks as always, Rounik, for your thoughtful, thorough, and very helpful response. I'll try testing my rig as it is set up now ( with the external in back of the 8pre, running on firewire 400) and see how it performs. Can't wait for various Thunderbolt devices to come out!
    • 8 years ago
    • By: Dekuruy
    Reply
  • Rounik Admin
    Thanks Adam! I know... Thunderbolt is set to be a massive game changer. I know that Apogee are working on this (audio interfaces) and Lacie and others are cooking up thunderbolt drives. Can you imagine who quick it'll be to backup your Mac over Thunderbolt!! Frightening thought! Anyway, as DJ Wolfie mentions, I'd also recommend using 7200 rpm or faster drives. Then again in a year or two perhaps all drives will be SSD... again - much, much faster and they're quieter as they have no moving parts.
    • 8 years ago
    • By: Rounik Admin
    Reply
  • DjWolfie
    Good question, and thank you Rounik for fielding that one. Excellent points. I have to go look up the thunderbolt tech that you mention. One last point too- firewire 800 tends to have better power supply to bus powered devices. USB runs out of juice much quicker. For instance, I tried using my Vestax vcm 600 and a akai mini keyboard- both usb powered- and I got a error message telling me there wasn't enough juice on the usb port.
    • 8 years ago
    • By: DjWolfie
    Reply
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